Bureau of Land Management

The BLM has done an excellent job of digitizing their historic maps and mining records. This work has been inspirational and informative.

 

Ghost Towns of Washington has the most comprehensive site of ghost towns and historic places of note on the web. These guys were the ones who inspired us to visit to Franklin, and continue to inspire us with their work.

 

We met a fantastic Green River Watershed Inspector on our visit to Lester, and we are grateful for all that shared with us about the town and the area.

 

We found out about these guys through their book, Hiking through History in Washington.  They have hundreds of trails marked out on their website, and inspired us to keep hitting the trail.

 

HistoryLink.org is remarkable resource for well written articles from primary resources. We are so thankful for this resource, and their policy to share their articles for educational purposes.

 

It's local historical organizations like the Index Historical Society that have proved to be the best storytellers of these places.  We are forever grateful to those who have worked to keep this history of their backyards alive for those of who have come later.

 

King County Parks is leading the way with preserving land for people and wildlife

 

It's local historical organizations that have proved to be the best storytellers of these places.  We are forever grateful to those who have worked to keep this history of their backyards alive for those of who have come later.

 

The Monte Cristo Preservation Association produced the brochure we picked up on the trail, and are largely responsible for ensuring the townsite has been preserved.

 

Most people think of MOHAI as a cool museum, but it's their archives that make us sing their praises.  

 

Northwest Underground Explorations wrote the book on finding mines in the Cascades. Literally. We are grateful for the tracks they laid down.

 

The Seattle Municipal Archives are an inspirational source of photographs and data related to the early days of Washington.

 

It's local historical organizations that have proved to be the best storytellers of these places.  We are forever grateful to those who have worked to keep this history of their backyards alive for those of who have come later.

 

We give special thanks to Bob Kelly, Collections Manager, for his expertise and help researching obscure mines.  This organization is doing an amazing job of keeping the history of the Skykomish Valley alive and available to all who have an interest. 

 

Snohomish County Parks include some wonderful spaces to enjoy.

 

We give special thanks to the staff and volunteers of this organization for their research assistance.  

 

The UW Special Collections is an outstanding source of primary information in the form of books and photographs.

 

The US Forest Service manages many of the historic places we've visited. We are grateful for these public lands!

 

The USGS was survey land and making accurate maps before electricity. We have learned a great deal from their well organized online archives, and have based our maps upon theirs.

 

We give Joe Smillie, of Washington DNR a tremendous of thanks for the historic mining records he found us. DNR also has outstanding online resources of geologic maps which have helped us understand the landscape on a much deeper level.

 

The Washington State Digital Archives have been a useful resource and cross-reference tool in our work.

 

There are lots of great lands available to enjoy because of the work of Washington State Parks.

 

WTA is a fantastic resource for hiking in Washington, and connecting with other hiking enthusiasts. They've also done a great job of bringing people together to build and maintain trails.

 

It's small local historical organizations like the White River Valley Museum that have proved to be the best storytellers of these places.  We are forever grateful to those who have worked to keep this history of their backyards alive for those of who have come later.